Division Highlights - Neonatology

The Division of Neonatology promotes the health and well-being of the newborn, whether critically ill, premature, or simply in need of special observation.

Research interests include genetic contributors to premature birth, nutrition and vitamin D in neonates, iron metabolism in newborns, chronic lung disease of prematurity, infection and inflammation, vascular adaptations in pregnancy, and models and methods of maternal-infant health care.

2009 Highlights

  • Via grant support, Georgia Ditzenberger, NNP-BC, PhD, implemented a neonatal simulation center (NSC) to improve nursing staff skills.
  • Pamela Kling, MD, was awarded (as co-investigator) an NIH RO1 grant, “Gestational Stress and Impaired Iron Homeostasis in the Infant.” Also, her mentored graduate student, Katie Meyer, received the best student presentation award at the Midwest Society for Pediatric Research meeting.
  • Associate residency program director Neena Shah, MD, organized and planned a four-hour workshop for senior residents, “The Resident as Leader.” She also developed a seven-workshop series, “Resident as Teacher,” that has been integrated into the residency core curriculum.

Faculty


De-Ann M. Pillers, MD, PhD

Professor

Georgia R. Ditzenberger, NNP, RNC, PhD

Assistant Professor

Frank R. Greer, MD

Professor

Julie M. Kessel, MD

Associate Professor

Pamela J. Kling, MD

Associate Professor

Neena D. Shah, MD

Clinical Associate Professor

   

Recent Publications

Drake KA, Sauerbry MJ, Blohowiak SE, Repyak KS, Kling PJ. Iron deficiency and renal development in the newborn rat. Pediatr Res. 2009 Dec;66(6):619-24.

Greer FR. Defining vitamin D deficiency in children: beyond 25-OH vitamin D serum concentrations. Pediatrics. 2009 Nov;124(5):1471-3. Epub 2009 Oct 26.

Greer FR. Methyl donors, iodine, and DHA--is maternal supplementation beneficial? Introduction. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Feb;89(2):661S-2S. Epub 2008 Dec 30.

Greer FR. Time to step up to the plate: adopting the WHO 2006 growth curves for US infants. Breastfeed Rev. 2009 Mar;17(1):5-7.

Linday LA, Shindledecker RD, Greer FR, Holick MF. Commentary on "Breastfeeding does not protect against urinary tract infection in the first 3 months of life, but vitamin D supplementation increases the risk by 76%". Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2010 Jan;49(1):93-4. Epub 2009 Sep 4.

Grant Support


Principal Investigator Funding Agency Title
Kling, Pamela DHHS, PHS, National Institutes of Health Physiologic Cardiovascular & Uterine eNOS Responses: Role of Endogenous Estrogen
Kling, Pamela UWF - Wisconsin Partnership - MERC Discerning the Causes and Consequences of Iron Deficiency in Infancy