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Resident Grad Douglas Diekema, MD, Wins AAP Ethics Award

Posted: October 27, 2014

Douglas Diekema, MD, a 1989 graduate of the UW Pediatrics Residency Program, received the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) William G. Bartholome Award for Ethical Excellence at its national meeting on October 13, 2014.

The Bartholome Award recognizes those who have significantly impacted public discussion of ethical issues in pediatric medicine. Dr. Diekema is a contributing author of the AAP’s Section on Bioethics’ case-based online modules for training residents and fellows, serves on the American Board of Pediatrics’ Ethics Committee, and is an editor of Clinical Ethics in Pediatrics: A Case-Based Textbook.

Dr. Diekema is pediatric emergency medicine physician, director of education for the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at Seattle Children’s Hospital and professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine.


Michelle Kelly, MD

Michelle Kelly, MD

Michelle Kelly, MD, Helps Organize DocTalk Madison

Posted: October 24, 2014

Michelle Kelly, MD, is one of a number of entrepreneurs, physician-scientists and students at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health who have come together to start a monthly meetup called DocTalk Madison. The group discusses important issues in healthcare from a technological perspective, searching for innovative new solutions.

Further details about the group can be found here.


Bruce Klein, MD

Bruce Klein, MD

Dr. Bruce Klein Receives Wisconsin Partnership Program Grant

Posted: October 7, 2014

Bruce Klein, MD, has received one of several grants recently awarded by the Wisconsin Partnership Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. The three year, $500,000 grant will enable Dr. Klein to study blastomycosis infection among Hmong-ancestry populations, which have a sharply elevated incidence of the disease. Blastomycosis is caused by a soil fungus, and the infection can lead to respiratory failure and neurological damage. The Partnership Program’s competitive Collaborative Health Sciences Program supports novel ideas and interdisciplinary approaches to research and education benefiting the health of Wisconsin residents.


Project ACE's New Logo

Winners Announced for Project ACE Logo Design Contest

Posted: October 7, 2014

Dr. Elizabeth Cox’s research team recently hosted a logo design contest for their diabetes study, Project ACE (Achieving control, Connecting resources, Empowering families).

Project ACE is a three-year collaborative study between UW and Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, supported by a $2 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

The winning logo contest designs were submitted by Debbie Rudin and Dana Mortenson. Both winners received a $50 gift card. Cox’s team worked with graphic designer Matthew Becker to create a logo for Project ACE inspired by Dana’s design.


Debbie Rudin

Debbie Rudin

Dana Mortenson

Dana Mortenson

Matthew Becker

Matthew Becker

 

D.B. Sanders, MD, MS

D.B. Sanders, MD, MS

D.B. Sanders, MD, MS, Receives UW-ICTR and Gilead Sciences Awards

Posted: October 3, 2014

Congratulations to D.B. Sanders, MD, MS, on his new awards from the UW-Institute of Clinical and Translational Research (UW-ICTR) and Gilead Sciences.

As an ICTR KL2 scholar, Dr. Sanders will receive 75% protected research time + $25,000/year to support his research. Funding from the Gilead Sciences Research Scholar Program in Cystic Fibrosis will support his project, "Determinants of the microbiome in young children with cystic fibrosis" at $130,000 over 2 years. This study will investigate the roles that antibiotics and viral infections play in the development of the microbial communities (or microbiomes) that exist in the airways and GI tracts of infants with cystic fibrosis (CF).

Children with CF frequently receive antibiotics for viral infections, but it is unknown how often viral infections require treatment with antibiotics, whether antibiotics contribute to disruptions seen in the microbiomes of children with CF, or if early CF lung disease is affected by disruptions of the microbiomes. Understanding how microbiomes develop in young children with CF, and the roles that viral infections and antibiotic exposures play in this process, will improve our understanding of early CF lung disease and may lead to alternative strategies to prevent and treat CF lung disease.


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Last updated: 10/30/2014
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