Skip to Content

Up to Date

Up to Date

In 2012, all eight UW Health pediatric primary care clinics exceeded institutional immunization benchmarks for children up to age two.

This success—the result of sustained process improvement and a deep commitment to providing quality care for children—dovetails with primary care redesign efforts across UW Health.

Read more...

Advancing Therapy for LCA16

Advancing Therapy for LCA16

In his laboratory, Bikash Pattnaik, PhD, investigates potassium channel mutations in retinal cells—mutations that are associated with Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), a genetic disease that causes blindness at birth.

Now, thanks to a $1 million-plus gift in support of Dr. Pattnaik’s research, the study of novel therapy approaches for the disease is expanding.

Read more...

Reducing CF ‘False Positives’

Reducing CF ‘False Positives’

Thanks to universal screening protocols, newborns in every state are routinely tested for cystic fibrosis (CF)—a life-threatening disease that occurs in 1 of every 4,000 births—through a simple blood test.

Most of the time, the screening results are negative. Due to technology limitations, however, each year approximately 150 CF screens in Wisconsin alone come back with a false positive result.

Read more...

The Rural Experience

The Rural Experience

Department of Pediatrics residents are now able to experience rural practice during their residency, thanks to a new elective rotation funded by the Wisconsin Rural Physician Residency Assistance Program (WRPRAP).

The rotation consists of two four-week “immersion” sessions in the PG2 and PG3 years, precepted by community pediatricians in Baraboo, Beaver Dam, Portage and Sauk City.

Read more...

‘A Beacon for Young People’

‘A Beacon for Young People’

Department of Pediatrics faculty, former faculty, staff and friends joined the family of former Professor John Stephenson, MD, in a naming reception for the John Stephenson Teenage and Young Adult Clinic.

The reception was held Thursday, April 25, 2013, at the Waisman Center. In addition to the presentation of a plaque in Dr. Stephenson’s honor, which will be installed in the University Station clinic, the event marked the launch of the Dr. John Stephenson Teen and Adolescent Fund. Read more...

Growing a Full-Service Pediatric Heart Program

Growing a Full-Service Pediatric Heart Program

It takes collaboration to care for a child with complex congenital heart disease. That’s why the pediatric heart program at American Family Children’s Hospital’s (AFCH) brings together experts from multiple specialties, including pediatric cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, intensive care, anesthesiology, and nursing.

Pediatric interventional cardiologist Luke Lamers, MD, is the department’s newest addition to that growing program. His extensive training and experience in catheter-based interventions is a perfect complement to a multidisciplinary team that provides state-of-the-art of care for children with congenital heart problems. Read more...

Understanding Predictors of Acute Sinusitis in Children

Understanding Predictors of Acute Sinusitis in Children

Like most children, five-year-old Lexi Frye will likely have a viral upper respiratory infection (URI) at least once this year. She may suffer though sniffles, cough, and congestion—and then recover. Or, she may be one of the estimated eight percent of children who develop acute bacterial sinusitis.

Although Lexi isn’t sick now, a study nurse is obtaining a nasopharygeal (NP) swab sample from her as part of a five-year clinical study led by department chair Ellen Wald, MD, that aims to determine the incidence and predictors of this common complication. Read more...

Building Bridges to Adult Healthcare

Building Bridges to Adult Healthcare

In many ways, the job of a pediatrician is like that of a parent: to prepare children to successfully navigate the adult world.

But for children with chronic illnesses or disabilities, that job is particularly complex.

At December’s “Successful Youth Transition into Adult Healthcare” Summit, approximately 80 clinicians from around the state learned the roles, processes, and systems required to help those children—and their families—make the leap from pediatric to adult healthcare. Read more...

Keeping Young Hearts Healthy

Keeping Young Hearts Healthy

Every Friday morning, pediatric cardiologist Amy Peterson, MD, sees children who, due to family history, medical conditions, or obesity, are at greater risk for heart disease when they become adults.

Reducing or eliminating those risks is the goal of the American Family Children’s Hospital pediatric preventive cardiology clinic (PPCC). Dr. Peterson founded the PPCC in 2010, and is the primary provider there, along with pediatric nurse practitioners Ann Dodge, PNP, and Erin Marriott, PNP. Read more...

New Drug, New Hope for Cystic Fibrosis

New Drug, New Hope for Cystic Fibrosis

Over 65 people gathered in person and via webcast at the UW Health Sciences Learning Center (HSLC) on Saturday, November 10, 2012, for the second Family Education Day for Cystic Fibrosis.

At the event, people with CF, and their families and friends, learned about legal considerations, new therapies, and coping strategies for the inherited disease. Read more...

‘A Place for Kids’ in the ED

‘A Place for Kids’ in the ED

Children who need emergency care now have a place at American Family Children’s Hospital (AFCH) just for them.

The new pediatric emergency unit, a separate area within the UW Hospital and Clinics Emergency Department (ED), has a dedicated children’s waiting area and six treatment rooms. Read more...

Caring for the Amish Children of Wisconsin

Caring for the Amish Children of Wisconsin

In 1989, in a cornfield in southeastern Pennsylvania, Holmes Morton, MD, built a timber-frame clinic to care for the area’s Old Order Amish and Mennonite children, many of whom had poorly understood, complex medical problems due to inherited disorders.

Since then, the Clinic for Special Children has cared for children with over 100 rare genetic disorders. Read more...

Using Pulse Oximetry to Find Hidden Congenital Heart Defects

Using Pulse Oximetry to Find Hidden Congenital Heart Defects

Each year in the United States, approximately 10,000 babies are born with critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs)—life-threatening anatomic problems that require surgery within the first month of birth.

Fortunately, in nearly all cases, CCHDs are caught during pregnancy or upon neonatal physical examination. But a substantial number of babies still die or have significant health problems because of unrecognized defects. Read more...

Peds GI Clinical Initiatives Flourish

Peds GI Clinical Initiatives Flourish

Children who have complex intestinal disease or who are failing to thrive benefit from new pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition clinical initiatives at American Family Children’s Hospital (AFCH)—initiatives that parallel the AFCH specialty’s improved ranking by US News and World Report. Read more...

Med Students Experience the Third Year Clerkship”

Med Students Experience the Third Year Clerkship

Third-year medical student Jasmine Zapata was a little nervous before her pediatrics clerkship. Not because she thought it would be too challenging, but because it might not be challenging enough.

“I knew the inpatient part would be exciting, but thought the outpatient part would be just a lot of runny noses and ear infections,” she recalled. “But I hoped for the best.” Read more...

James Conway to SMPH Class of 2012: “Demand Change”

James Conway to SMPH Class of 2012: “Demand Change”

“Be an agent of change.”

It’s a simple message, but in medicine, as in life, it can change the world.

It’s also the message James Conway, MD, an associate professor in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, wanted this year’s graduates of the School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) to carry with them as they begin their medical careers. Read more...

Celebrating Research & Learning in Pediatrics

Celebrating Research & Learning in Pediatrics

Pediatrics faculty, residents, fellows, and students came together again to celebrate research accomplishments during the department’s annual Spring Research Day, held Friday, April 13, 2012, at the Health Sciences Learning Center (HSLC).

The event was preceded on Thursday, April 12, by a special Grand Rounds presentation by Professor and Chair Ellen Wald, MD. Read more...

Peds Faculty Teach PALS+ Course

Peds Faculty Teach PALS+ Course

When children are acutely ill or injured, a few minutes can mean the difference between life and death. Courses like the Pediatrics Advanced Life Support + (PALS+) provider course provide clinicians who care for those children with the skills they need to save lives in the critical first hour.

Instructors included faculty from the Department of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology, the American Family Children’s Hospital (AFCH) Emergency Department, and the AFCH Children’s Hospital Emergency Transport Service (CHETA). Read more...

Renewed Hope for Life-Threatening Cancer

Renewed Hope for Life-Threatening Cancer

A reopened clinical trial led by Department of Pediatrics Associate Professor Kenneth DeSantes, MD, may offer hope for children with life-threatening cancer that hasn’t responded to conventional treatment.

The trial uses an experimental therapy called natural killer (NK) cell infusions to boost the body’s ability to fight cancer after stem-cell transplant. Read more...

CHETA is Off and Running

CHETA is Off and Running

Don’t be deceived by the stuffed animals and stickers onboard: American Family Children’s Hospital’s (AFCH) Emergency Transport Ambulance, or CHETA, is a true pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) on wheels.

Loaded with extensive equipment, including state-of-the-art pediatric monitors, invasive and noninvasive ventilators, and an isolette, CHETA is setup to safely transport even the smallest critically ill child from a regional hospital to AFCH. Read more...

Personal Best Meets Professional Commitment

Personal Best Meets Professional Commitment

David Allen, MD, a professor in the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, was bitten by the running bug during his pediatric internship year here at UW.

He’d been a runner on and off throughout high school and college, but when he arrived in Madison, he found that running helped him stay healthy and cope better with the intensity of residency training. Read more...

Genetic Counselor Training Program At Home in Pediatrics

Genetic Counselor Training Program At Home in Pediatrics

For the UW-Madison Genetic Counselor Training Program, there’s no place like home—in Pediatrics.

The program, which had been part of the Department of Medical Genetics for 35 years, joined the Department of Pediatrics in the spring of 2010.

Now, with improved clinician access, administrative stability, and School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) backing, the program can better support its students, teachers, and staff—and remain at the forefront of an evolving profession. Read more...

Pediatrics Residency Graduate, Researcher Improve Health Care in Rural Uganda

Pediatrics Residency Graduate, Researcher Improve Health Care in Rural Uganda

Implementing sustainable health care models in the developing world has become a way of life for Lisa Umphrey, MD, a 2010 graduate of the Pediatrics residency program, and her husband and former department research scientist Douglas DaSilva.

The two recently spent over a year managing and staffing a clinic in rural Uganda—at one point with help from Pediatrics faculty Francois Luyet, MD—and are now taking the model they developed there to other locations throughout the country. Read more...

UW Pediatrics Hosts Midwest SPR Meeting

UW Pediatrics Hosts Midwest SPR Meeting

On October 6-7, 2011, the UW Department of Pediatrics welcomed more than 120 academic pediatricians to Madison’s Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center for the 52nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Midwest Society for Pediatric Research (MWSPR).

Kicking off the event was a special Pediatrics Grand Rounds presentation by Michael Ackerman, MD, PhD, a professor of medicine, pediatrics, and pharmacology at Mayo School of Medicine. Dr. Ackerman spoke about the genetic determinants of Long QT syndrome, a rare heart rhythm disorder that can trigger fainting spells or seizures. Read more...

Volunteers Fit Bike Helmets at ‘Ride the Drive’ Events

Volunteers Fit Bike Helmets at ‘Ride the Drive’ Events

For the second year, a team of more than 15 volunteers, including Department of Pediatrics faculty and residents, donated their Sunday afternoons to help fit bike helmets during Madison’s Ride the Drive bike events, held June 5 and September 25, 2011.

The volunteers staffed two helmet fitting stations along the route, each of which were marked by large banners provided by the American Family Children’s Hospital’s (AFCH) Child Health Advocacy Program. Read more...

CDC-Recognized School Asthma Clinic Ensures Care for At-Risk Children

CDC-Recognized School Asthma Clinic Ensures Care for At-Risk Children

Pediatric nurse practitioner Kathleen Shanovich, RN, MS, was a school nurse in Madison for six years. She remembers firsthand the struggles of families who have children with asthma and allergies, and the problems associated with asthma-related absenteeism.

That’s why, after she joined the UW Health clinical team, she continued working closely with the Madison Metropolitan School District and American Family Children’s Hospital to create a School Asthma Clinic. Read more...

PICU Team Prevents Central Line Bloodstream Infections

PICU Team Prevents Central Line Bloodstream Infections

A team led by Associate Professor and Vice President of Quality Improvement Tom Brazelton, MD, MPH, is participating in a national collaborative quality project to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections at the American Family Children’s Hospital (AFCH) Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU).

Central line-associated bloodstream infections can result in significant medical costs and complications. As many as one in four people who get them will die. Read more...

Endocrinology Fellow Wins SPR’s Clinical Research Award

Endocrinology Fellow Wins SPR’s Clinical Research Award

The Society for Pediatric Research (SPR) considers the research of Endocrinology and Diabetes fellow Jennifer Rehm, MD, among the best in the nation.

On May 2, 2011, Dr. Rehm was one of three fellows who received the SPR's 2011 Fellow Clinical Research Award at the group's annual meeting in Denver. She was honored for her research on early detection of fatty liver disease in overweight adolescent girls. Read more...

Including Families at Bedside Rounds

Including Families at Bedside Rounds

Assistant Professor Elizabeth Cox, MD, PhD, is helping families participate more fully in the care of their children while hospitalized at American Family Children’s Hospital (AFCH).

Through recent grants from the Arthur Vining Davis Foundation, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Patient Safety Foundation, Dr. Cox is working with colleagues from several inpatient services to develop, implement, and evaluate ways to enhance family-centered rounds (FCRs) for hospitalized children. Read more...

Recognized for Clinical Excellence

Recognized for Clinical Excellence

"It's wonderful when folks catch you doing something right," says Associate Professor Carol Diamond, MD, medical director of the UW Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Clinic.

She certainly would know. Last spring, Dr. Diamond was one of four physicians—and the only pediatrician among them—to receive one of UW Health's first Physician Leadership awards. First created in 2010, the awards honor physicians for excellence in clinical practice or clinical education. Read more...

The Influence of Social Media on Adolescent Behavior

The Influence of Social Media on Adolescent Behavior

Social networking Web sites, such as Facebook and MySpace, can have a tremendous impact on adolescents’ health.

Previous research with traditional media has shown that exposure to substance use and sexual content is linked to initiation of those behaviors. The difference is that with social media, adolescents not only consume information, they also produce it.

That’s why the Adolescent Health Research team, led by Assistant Professor Megan Moreno, MD, MSEd, MPH, is investigating the health implications of social media use among adolescents. Read more...

Lifecourse Initiative Improves Birth Outcomes in Wisconsin

Lifecourse Initiative Improves Birth Outcomes in Wisconsin

Last year, Department of Pediatrics Professor Philip Farrell, MD, PhD, became steering committee co-chair of the Lifecourse Initiative for Healthy Families (LIHF), a $10 million initiative to improve birth outcomes in Wisconsin.

Why? Because the infant mortality rate for African Americans in Wisconsin is the worst in the nation. Babies born to African American mothers were three to four times more likely to die in the first year than their white counterparts. It's considered by many to be the most serious health problem facing the state. Read more...

Immunotherapy for Children with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

Immunotherapy for Children with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

Research from the laboratory of Professor Paul Sondel, MD, PhD, has played a key role in the development and testing of an effective new treatment for some children with high-risk neuroblastoma.

Neuroblastoma is a cancer of the sympathetic nervous system most commonly found in children under the age of five. Nearly half of neuroblastoma cases are considered “high-risk,” meaning that the disease is likely to spread aggressively—and the child is likely to die—if only standard chemotherapy treatment is given. Read more...

A Year in the Life of Rylee

A Year in the Life of Rylee

Rylee's story began on January 8, 2009, at the emergency department at American Family Children's Hospital (AFCH). She was brought there with bloody diarrhea and dehydration, which was found to be caused by two types of foodborne bacteria: Shigella and E. coli.

Three days later, Rylee developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, a disease that can occur in children with these types of bacterial infections). It caused Rylee's kidneys to shut down. Read more...

 

Resident/Fellow Scholarship Flourishes

Resident/Fellow Scholarship Flourishes

UW Department of Pediatrics Associate Professor and Vice Chair for Education John Frohna, MD, MPH, believes that residency education programs must prepare physicians for whatever career path they want—whether it be academic medicine or general private practice.

But regardless of the path chosen, Dr. Frohna also believes "there is always value in understanding the process of asking and answering a research question."

That's why, in 2009, the department created a formal research requirement for all its residents. Read more...

New Formula, Drug Research Helps Patients Manage PKU

New Formula, Drug Research Helps Patients Manage PKU

Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a rare genetic disorder in which the body is unable to metabolize phenylalanine, an amino acid found in almost every source of natural protein.

Patients with PKU must follow a strict diet that is low in phenylalanine—and consequently, low in protein—for their whole lives. In order to keep growth on track during childhood, they also must drink a special phenylalanine-free protein formula. Read more...

Advanced Treatment and Neonatal Screening Save a Newborn’s Life

Advanced Treatment and Neonatal Screening Save a Newborn’s Life

Tyler was the 8 1/2-pound, first-born child of a Baraboo, Wisconsin couple. His mother had a normal pregnancy and routine delivery, and after a standard hospital stay, the new family returned home. But on the third day of Tyler’s life, his mother became concerned. Tyler was not breastfeeding well and was difficult to arouse. His parents took him to a local hospital, where physicians thought he might have an infection or a metabolic problem. Read more...

Infants Exposed to Dogs Less Likely to Develop Allergic Diseases

Infants Exposed to Dogs Less Likely to Develop Allergic Diseases

For many children, a beloved cat or dog is as much a part of the family as Mom, Dad, brother, or sister. But for others, a furry pet means wheezing, eczema, rhinitis, or other allergic reactions. At first, it would seem logical to keep children at risk for allergies away from household pets. But research conducted at the UW Department of Pediatrics found the opposite to be true. Exposure to dogs in infancy—especially around the time of birth—can actually influence children’s immune development and reduce the likelihood of certain allergic diseases. Read more...

Education Helps Grow Fit Kids

Education Helps Grow Fit Kids

Department of Pediatrics Associate Professor Aaron Carrel, MD, has a big mission: to prevent obesity and diabetes, and promote fitness, in children. As a physician, researcher, and ultimately an educator, he has found innovative ways to help children throughout Wisconsin lead healthier lives. Read more...

Last updated: 03/12/2014
webmaster [at] pediatrics [dot] wisc [dot] edu
Copyright © 2014 The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System