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Clinical Research Makes Great Strides

With 43 active clinical research studies last year—a 16 percent increase from the previous year—our faculty are bringing even more research investigations into the patient care setting.

One new multicenter study, led by pediatric nephrologist Sharon Bartosh, MD, is defining the clinical course of children who have shiga toxin-producing E. coli-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disease with a 5% to 10% risk of mortality. This study will be the first of its kind, documenting the clinical course and outcomes of 350 children with diarrhea-associated HUS with the aim of improving the care of these children and potentially identifying treatment modalities.

To screen for critical congenital heart defects, neonatologist Elizabeth Goetz, MD, MPH, places probes on a newborn’s foot and hand to measure oxygen saturation.

To screen for critical congenital heart defects, neonatologist Elizabeth Goetz, MD, MPH, places probes on a newborn’s foot and hand to measure oxygen saturation.

To screen for critical congenital heart defects, neonatologist Elizabeth Goetz, MD, MPH, places probes on a newborn’s foot and hand to measure oxygen saturation.

Pediatric cardiologist John Hokanson, MD, is leading a Health Resources and Services Administration-supported statewide collaboration to implement universal pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart defects. In addition, pediatric interventional cardiologist Luke Lamers, MD, is participating in a multicenter evaluation of a new catheter-guided device used to treat pulmonary valve conduit failure in children.

Neonatologist De-Ann Pillers, MD, PhD, is collaborating with Isomark, LLC, to evaluate a noninvasive technology that monitors neonates’ exhaled breath for changes in carbon values. The study aims to determine whether those changes are an early predictor of systemic infection in the newborn, which can occur in infants whose mothers have chorioamnionitis, a condition associated with inflammation of the fetal membranes due to a bacterial infection. 

Pediatric infectious disease specialist and department chair Ellen Wald, MD, is leading a National Institute of Health (NIH)-funded study to determine the incidence of acute bacterial sinusitis in children, identify its viral antecedents and other infection risk factors, and design strategies to reduce disease burden and antimicrobial resistance.

Dr. Wald is also leading another NIH-funded project that combines in-person group counseling with web-based interventions to prevent and treat obesity in young children.

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Last updated: 03/12/2014
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